Author Archive for: Justin Bolduc

 

Overhead Crane & Monorail Safety

Part 1: Before you lift the load

The conditions at the operating site for the hoist must correspond to the operating conditions for which the hoist is designed (including indoor/outdoor use, ambient temperature/radiance temperature, wind, dust, splashing, snow, water, handling hazardous materials, fire risk, etc).  Check that there is adequate lighting at the operating site for operating the hoist safely and efficiently.  If the control position is located on the hoist, check that you can exit from the hoist safely in respective of the hoist’s position on the runway.

Be sure  there are adequate service platforms on the hoist and adequate equipment at the operating site for servicing and inspecting the hoist.  Check that the hoist meets the applicable safety requirements. As always, be certain that the hoist meets the applicable operating requirements and ensure that the components, electrical connections and steel structures of the hoist have been inspected and certified as defect- free.  Also determine if the test loading, test drive and commissioning inspection have been properly carried out and that the handover log has been properly completed.

Safety instructions for operating the hoist:

  1. Read all instructions supplied with the hoist. The hoist operator must be familiar with the instructions and follow them.  The hoist operator must be competent for the task, must know all the controls of the hoist and must be able to use them correctly and safely.  The hoist operator must know how to operate the hoist and must be aware of any risk of accident posed by the operating site.  Learn how to operate the hoist in safe conditions before actually starting to work with the hoist. Learn how to control the movements of the hook and load. Use the Hoist Owner’s Manual to familiarize yourself with the hoist and hoist controls.
  2. Familiarize yourself with the signs and warnings marked on the hoist. The direction symbols for hoist motions are the same as the symbols marked on the push button controller.Check the direction symbols in the Hoist Owner Manual.  Learn the hand signals for indicating hoisting motion, trolley traversing and crane travel. The hoist operator should only accept hand signals from a person authorized to give them.  Ensure that there is adequate lighting as well as proper tools and equipment for the working site and that appropriate working procedures are established.
  3. If the hoist is provided with motion locking devices (EG, rail clamps), open the locking devices before using the hoist.  Before switching on the main current, ensure that all controls are in the 0-position.  Connect current to hoist by turning on the safety switches for main current and for control current.
  4. Close the main contractor by pressing the “START” push button.  If the push button incorporates a selection switch, ensure that the selection switch is in the correct position before using the control push buttons.  Check that all safety switches operate.  Check that the breaks operate.  A hoist that operates outdoors or in cold premises which has been out of service for a longer than normal period of time should always be first started to move the hook upwards in order to avoid damage to the roping from freezing of the rope guide.

 

Spacemaster SX Hoists on Crane-Tec Overhead Cranes

The Spacemaster SX represents a revolutionary new generation of exceptionally reliable electric wire rope hoists, featuring advanced technology and cutting edge performance.

An innovative design that includes a large drum diameter gives Spacemaster SX hoists the lowest headrooms and best wheel loads in the overhead crane industry, while providing near true vertical lift with single reeved hoists, plus exceptional overhead crane hook approaches and heights of lift.  Unique features include low maintenance, sealed brakes; and trolley inverter control.  The standard hoist nameplate will carry a CSA c/us rating as well as NEMA 3R rating for the electric enclosures.

Spacemaster SX hoists are designed to meet and exceed either ASME H3 or ASME H4 duty ratings and provide the ultimate in easy load handling and overhead crane handling.

Standard configurations for overhead cranes include normal headroom, low headroom and double girder trolley designs.  Hoists in short ton ratings or metric tonne ratings meet a wide variety of application requirements.

Spacemaster Hoists on Crane-Tec Overhead Cranes = Savings in New Construction.

Unmatched Clearances – The floor area under your new overhead crane can now be used more efficiently.  Better hook to wall dimensions compared to the competition.

Lower roof heights/maximum lifting heights – Your new building design can be smaller and more functional giving you saving in initial construction.  Better hook to ceiling dimension.

Lower operating costs – Continual savings in heating and/or air conditioning expenses over the lifetime of your building.

Maximum flexibility – Factory layout and material flow planning is optimized.

 

Case Study

The Challenge:

  • To provide our customer, a major construction equipment dealer, with a building supported overhead crane system for a new facility in Kentucky. The job incorporated two 10 ton single girder overhead cranes.

Special Consideration:

  • The general contractor needed design build capabilities for the overhead crane and runway systems. Single girder overhead cranes with low headroom hoists were utilized to minimize overhead crane and building steel costs.

Results:

  • The general contractor maximized the strength of the building while Crane-Tec supplied a complete overhead crane system and the owner maximized floor space. The overhead cranes were weight tested and turned over to the customer ahead of schedule.

For Immediate Results
Call 800-755-6378
CRANE-TEC.COM

 

Overhead Crane

Overhead crane

Overhead Crane

 

Overhead Crane Case Study

The Challenge:

  • To provide our customer, a leading trucking accessories supplier, with a complete design build of an under running 5 ton overhead crane system. The job incorporated the 5 ton overhead crane system and (2) ½ ton jib cranes.

Special Considerations:

  • The general contractor needed design build capabilities for the overhead crane and runway system. Crane-Tec provided complete design of the under hung runway system and incorporated it into the general contractors special overhead crane truss system.

Our Team Approach:

  • Our engineers, armed with building drawings, determined runway steel and hanger design. Engineered drawings with overhead crane loads were submitted to the general contractor for approval. Crane-Tec’s experienced field crew installed the complete system and jib cranes in under 3 days to meet the G.C.’s demanding schedule.

Results: 

  • The general contractor maximized the strength of the building while Crane-Tec supplied a turn key overhead crane system and the owner maximized floor space. The overhead cranes were ahead of schedule allowing the owner to set up manufacturing machinery with the use of the overhead crane.

 

Case Study

The Challenge:

  • To provide our customer, a leading forklift manufacturer, with a complete under running 12 ton overhead crane system. The job incorporated the 12 ton runway system and four under running overhead cranes.

Special Considerations:

  • The customer needed design build capabilities for the overhead crane and runway system. Crane-Tec provided complete design of the under hung runway system and incorporated it into the customers metal building.

Our Team Approach:

  • Our engineers, armed with building drawings, determined runway steel and hanger design. Engineered drawings with loads were submitted for approval. Crane-Tec’s experienced field crew installed the complete system and overhead cranes in under 4 days, allowing the customer to use the equipment in the installation of new machinery.

 

Job History: 5 Ton Crane Syetem

5 Ton Overhead Crane

The Challenge:

  • To provide our customer, a major wire manufacturer, with multiple free-standing overhead crane systems for a new manufacturing facility. The job incorporated a 5 ton capacity free-standing runway system and (2) 5 ton top running double girder tie-back runway systems.

Special Consideration:

  • The general contractor needed design build capabilities for the overhead crane and runway systems. Existing building height limitations requires use of both single girder and double girder overhead crane systems, both with custom low headroom hoists.

Our TEAM Approach:

  • Our engineers, armed with the metal building drawings, determined runway steel locations and sizes. Engineered drawings with loads were submitted to the general contractor for approval.

For Immediate Results
Call 800-755-6378
WWW.CRANE-TEC.COM

 

Insulated Safety Bar

Over the last few years, many new insulated type safety electrification systems have been developed. All of these systems provide a safe means for bringing power to hoists and bridge cranes.

  • The Enclosed Duct Type:  Has two or more conductors inside a square metal track, or individual insulated bars of galvanized steel, copper, or aluminum. These bars are completely enclosed with an insulated shield which has a split on the front edge. A set of collector shoes on the passing crane or hoist equipment bears firmly against the electrification bar and virtually opens the insulated jacket which springs closed again as the equipment passes. This type of electrification can be used for straight or curved requirements.

To accommodate for icing and extreme climate problems, sheet metal covers can be placed over the bars for weather protection and high temperature jackets are available in most situations. The duct type systems are considerably more expensive, utilizing a multiple collector trolley riding inside the square duct. It is a sturdier system and generally offers good weather protection for outside installations. By far the most popular style of insulated system used by crane manufacturers is the individual insulated bar.

 

FESTOONING ELECTRICIFICATION

Festooning (looped wire) cable systems are simple and inexpensive types of available electrification and offer a relatively trouble free method of bringing electric power to moving equipment. Typically, the only problem with festooning is that the hanging loops could tangle with obstructions or interfere with lifts if installed in areas with low ceilings. Modern festooning systems are normally designed so these possible trouble areas can be eliminated. Festooning systems are an exceptionally valuable system when extensive electrification is required to accommodate numerous push button stations in a pendant control suspended from the crane hoist.

The systems are also extremely effective in high moisture areas or where chemical fumes are present. Festooning may be the only type of electrification that can be used for these applications.  Festoon systems are not recommended for long runways and are generally used for travel lengths limited to 60 feet. Also, festooning wire suspended from a small track and trolley system can be extended for usage up to 150 feet.

 

Bare Wire Electrification

The most popular system presently on older bridge cranes is bare, hard drawn, copper wire although it is rarely provided today on new equipment. Local electrician codes prohibit their use except under specific conditions.  These systems are installed by a number of hard drawn solid copper or aluminum wires being stretched along the sides of the crane track or under the roof beams and held in place by insulated hangars. This system can only be insulated on straight runs.

For special applications where it is possible to isolate equipment and personnel from electrical lines or when extreme temperatures prevent the use of insulated types of electrification, bare wire can offer an excellent means of bringing power to the equipment.  These bare wires do present a very dangerous safety hazard for service personnel working on equipment or where metal bars, ladders, scaffolding  or other obstructions may come in contact with the lines.